Friday, March 28, 2014

Palliative care Motion to be debated in Canadian parliament on Tuesday April 1, 2014.

On Thursday, March 27, Steven Fletcher MP (CPC) introduced private members bills to legalize euthanasia in Canada.


Charlie Angus
On Tuesday, April 1, 2014 Motion 456, that has been sponsored by Charlie Angus MP (NDP), will receive its first hour of debate in the Parliament of Canada. 

The Euthanasia Prevention Coalition (EPC) wants its supporters to contact their Member of Parliament to ask them to support M 456. 

Link to the Member of Parliament contact information.

Email Mr Angus MP (NDP) and tell him that you support M-456. Contact Mr Angus at: charlie.angus@parl.gc.ca.


EPC also supports the recent three year commitment by the Canada's Minister of Health to provide $3 million dollars per year funding to the Pallium Foundation of Canada to train Canadian medical care-givers to provide excellent palliative care for their patients. Link to the article.


Please contact Canada's Minister of Health, Hon Rona Ambrose and thank her for making a three year commitment to the Pallium Foundation of Canada. Link.

The text of Motion 456.

M-456 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should establish a Pan-Canadian Palliative and End-of-life Care Strategy by working with provinces and territories on a flexible, integrated model of palliative care that: (a) takes into account the geographic, regional, and cultural diversity of urban and rural Canada; (b) respects the cultural, spiritual and familial needs of Canada’s First Nation, Inuit and Métis people; and (c) has the goal of (i) ensuring all Canadians have access to high quality home-based and hospice palliative end-of-life care, (ii) providing more support for caregivers, (iii) improving the quality and consistency of home and hospice palliative end-of-life care in Canada, (iv) encouraging Canadians to discuss and plan for end-of-life care.

M-456 — M. Angus (Timmins—Baie James) — Que, de l’avis de la Chambre, le gouvernement devrait adopter une stratégie pancanadienne de soins palliatifs et de fin de vie en travaillant avec les provinces et les territoires diversité géographique, régionale et culturelle des régions urbaines et rurales au Canada; b) respecte les besoins culturels, spirituels et familiaux des Premières Nations, Inuits et Métis du Canada; c) vise à faire en sorte que (i) tous les Canadiens aient accès à des soins palliatifs et de fin de vie de première qualité à domicile et en établissement, (ii) davantage de soutien soit aà l’élaboration d’un modèle souple et intégré de soins palliatifs qui : a) tient compte de la pporté aux aidants, (iii) la qualité et la cohérence des soins palliatifs et de fin de vie à domicile et en établissement au Canada soient améliorés, (iv) les Canadiens soient encouragés à discuter de soins de fin de vie et de leur planification.

Link to similar articles:
● Canadian government is committed to increasing palliative care training.
● Euthanasia: End of life care hinges on recognizing and treating pain.
Parliamentary Committee on Palliative and Compassionate Care offers great hope to Canadians.

8 comments:

Eleanor Harris said...

I do not agree with Euthanasia in any way, We do not have the right to take another persons life. God makes that very plain in his commandments. "Thou shalt not kill". As far as I am concerned it is the same thing.. You can say this is just another religious nut case , ignore her, but I am telling you that to pass this bill would be a direct violation of Gods laws.. You will pay the price for disobeying them..

Sharon Shortt said...

What if death does not stop the pain? Have you ever thought of that?

Camille Giglio said...

When you say you support palliative care do you really mean foregoing all curative care? Doesn't palliative care also negate nutrition and hydration? And, what then is the definition of end-of=life? If one foregoes curative care during an illness wouldn't that automatically produce the end-of-life? Is it now acceptable to plan and control one's own death?

Alex Schadenberg said...

We support excellent palliative care, we do not support the intentional dehydration of people who are not otherwise dying.

For someone who is dying and nearing death, it is often necessary to withdraw food and fluids.

We also support curative measures for people who may also be receiving pain and symptom management. We do not view good palliative care as ignoring the reality that some people will benefit from treatment.

Bobby Brown said...

Hospice is the same as death with dignity, they simple adjust the saturation point or the drip and kill a person. Families should only have people around their loved ones that vow to support life to the very last breath, anything else is compicity to euthanasia or death by doctor, nurse or responder. This applies to withholding food or fluids as bc courts have decided against that on the spoon case, thank God. Letting compassion and choices or the hemlock society get their foot in the door will lead Canada to a national blood bath. The catholic hospital in bellingham washington killed my wife and state legislators are turning their backs because the church says one thing and does the other. There are incentives for bad doctors to put you down paid by the governments and it is a simple way to avoid malpractice suits. Peacehealth is taking over state run hospitals and pushing their agendas that many are questioning that will change the medical field forever as obamacare is doing in the states. The pope says he's against all this, while his hospital's actionlope clearly show otherwise. TalkPlatelets

bonnie mills said...

Regarding Bobby Browns comment on Hospice-We do not adjust the saturation point or the drip and kill a person. The person is given pain medication to the point that their pain is controlled. It is a reallity that people fear having to languish in pain at the end. Note, I said FEAR. But this is not so. We can treat the pain with many modalities that do not always effect the level of consciousness; or, the medical profession together with the family can choose to creat a pain free state with the help of something that may also relieve anxiety with mild sedation that would creat sleepiness. B. Mills

Helmut Heimer said...

Bobby Brown my father died as a consequence of with intravenous narcotics and lack of suctioning when he was placed in palliative care. The decision for this "treatment" as well as the decision to place him in palliative care in the first place was made by the doctors against my will and against his will. I had power of attorney for him. In his case palliative care acted as a replacement for "involuntary" euthanasia and there is practically no difference except that it takes a little longer. My father was not critically ill, nor terminally ill. He suffered of absolutely no illness and none of his major organs were affected. This was shown in the autopsy report. He did not even suffer a heart attack. He was simply not allowed to breathe and died because of oxygen depletion due to the lack of suctioning and the intravenously injected narcotics. So Bonnie Mills, sorry, but what you say is incorrect. The saturation can and is adjusted. And so is the drip.I have first hand evidence of this.

Helmut Heimer said...

Fact is that when the patient is not terminal, placing him in palliative care is a form of inflicting on him a slower form of euthanasia. My father died as a consequence of being injected intravenously with narcotics and lack of suctioning while in palliative care. The decision to place him in palliative care as well as the decision for this "treatment" were made without consent, by the doctors, against my will and against his will. I had power of attorney for him. In his case palliative care acted as a replacement for "involuntary" euthanasia. There is practically no difference between the two except that one takes a little longer than the other. My father was not critically ill, nor terminally ill. He suffered of absolutely no illness and none of his major organs were affected. This was shown in the autopsy report. He did not even suffer a heart attack. He was simply not allowed to breathe and died because of oxygen depletion due to the lack of suctioning and the intravenously injected narcotics. So Bonnie Mills, sorry, but what you say is incorrect. The saturation can and is adjusted. And so is the drip.I have first hand evidence of this.

Printfriendly