Friday, February 3, 2023

Alberta euthanasia deaths increased by more than 40% in 2022 while Manitoba euthanasia deaths decreased.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Alex Schadenberg
According to Alberta Health Services, in 2022, the number of (MAiD) euthanasia deaths increased by more than 40% to 836 deaths up from 594 in 2021. There were 205 euthanasia deaths in 2017, the first full year of euthanasia in Canada.

A Global News report by Shane Gibson indicates that in 2022 there were 223 Manitoba (MAiD) euthanasia deaths which is down from 245 in 2021. Gibson reported that Shared Health Manitoba indicated that formal requests for euthanasia also went down from 387 in 2021 to 341 in 2022.

I recently reported that The Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario released the December 2022 MAiD data which  indicates that there were 3934 reported euthanasia deaths which increased by 27% from 3102 in 2021.

On December 9, 2022 the seventh annual report from Québec’s Commission on end of life care was filed in Québec’s National Assembly. The report covered the 2021-2022 period (April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022). The Commission reported 3,663 euthanasia deaths declared by doctors during the fiscal year which was up by 51% over the previous year. The number of euthanasia deaths reported by facilities was 3,629 and the report from the Collège des Médecins du Québec totalled 3,952 leaving a discrepancy of 289 deaths

The Québec Commission does not provide an explanation for the discrepancy of 289 deaths, but it appears that some doctors are not reporting euthanasia deaths. The same problem may exist in other jurisdictions but it is impossible to prove since Québec is the only province that collects data from more than one source. 


Clearly, there are different approaches to euthanasia in each province. More Provincess need to assert their constitutional authority and prevent euthanasia for mental illness and the indiscriminate use of euthanasia.

United Church of Canada approves euthanasia prayer.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Churchill Park United Church
On March 9, 2022, Churchill Park United Church in Winnipeg Manitoba hosted the euthanasia death of Betty Sanguin (86).

As euthanasia becomes widely prevalent in Canada and available to an expanding list of people living with physical or mental illness, the United Church of Canada approved a prayer written by cleric David Sparks and Sheila Noyes, former co-president of the euthanasia lobby group, Dying with Dignity Canada.

Prayer in the Midst of Fear

I am afraid. I feel fear penetrating my mind and my heart. I feel fear in my gut.

I am afraid to die. I do not know what lies beyond the barrier of death. I am afraid to release myself to the great unknown.

I am heartbroken and afraid to leave my family. I am still needed!

I have let go of hope for healing, and I hold on to hope for the next life.

I am afraid that my family and loved ones, children and grandchildren will be troubled when I tell them I plan to die using medical aid in dying (MAID).

(Prayerfully speak of other fears)

But, in the midst of my fear, I have hope that my family and loved ones, children and grandchildren will understand the choice to end my suffering.

I hope they will be proud of my decision and will understand that MAID is consistent with the love and compassion of Jesus. I have such peace in knowing this is my choice. My family loves me but they cannot feel my suffering, they cannot comprehend my helplessness.

I have hope and assurances that my death will be gentle. I am grateful that I can make this choice, for I am terrified of dying in pain and being helpless.

This choice to determine when I have had enough gives me peace even in the midst of the fear.

I feel that fear throws up a barrier between you and me, Loving God, a barrier so hard to penetrate, and I want that barrier down.

Come to me, Compassionate God, come to me as fear weighs me down and gets in the way of the joy and peace I want to feel and share around. Come to me and embrace me with your Eternal Love.

In the deepest part of me, I believe it will be your love that casts out fear for this waiting time and for my final journey through death.

I pray in the name of the suffering Jesus. Amen

People should always have compassion for people who are living with physical or mental illness, but the United Church is praying for and approving the act of killing.

Thursday, February 2, 2023

Canada to delay euthanasia for mental illness until March 2024.

This is not a victory. The government is only delaying the implementation of euthanasia for mental illness.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

David Fraser reported for The Canadian Press that Justice Minister David Lametti introduced Bill C-39 to delay the implementation of euthanasia for mental illness (for one year) until March 17, 2024.

Bill C-7, which was passed on March 17, 2021, among other things, legalized euthanasia for mental illness with a two-year moratorium. Therefore euthanasia for mental illness alone was to be implemented on March 17, 2023. The latest government plan delays the implementation for one more year.

This is not a victory since it only delays the implementation of euthanasia for mental illness. 

Further to that, I do not trust the government. As stated by Peter Zimonjic for CBC news:

If Bill C-39 is not passed by March 17 of this year, MAID for people solely suffering from mental illness will become law in Canada. The legislation cannot be passed after that date because the two-year time limit will have ended.

It is possible that the bill to delay implementation of euthanasia for mental illness will be held up or defeated in the Senate and thus permitting euthanasia for mental illness on March 17, 2023.

David Lametti
According to the Canadian Press report:

Canadians whose sole condition is a mental disorder will not be eligible for a medically assisted death for another year under legislation introduced in the House of Commons Thursday.

Justice Minister David Lametti introduced the bill seeking to delay extending the eligibility until March 17, 2024.

“We need to be prudent. We need to move step by step, making sure that people within the profession, Canadian society at large, has internalized this step,” Lametti told reporters.

“To be honest, we could have gone forward with the original date, but we want to be sure. We want to be safe. We want everybody to be on the same page.”

The Liberal government backed off from implementing euthanasia for mental illness this year because most psychiatrists are stating that it is impossible to determine if a person with a mental illness has an irremediable medical condition, as required by the law. 

There have also been many sad stories of people with disabilities who died by euthanasia based on poverty, homelessness or an inability to receive medical treatments.

People with mental illness are often living in poverty, experiencing homelessness or unable to get the necessary treatment for mental illness. Permitting euthanasia for people with mental illness is not about autonomy but rather abandonment of people in need of care.

Yesterday I reported that Alberta Premier Danielle Smith objects to expanding euthanasia to include mental illness. Québec has already objected to euthanasia for mental illness. Provinces must assert their constitutional authority and prevent euthanasia for mental illness.

Further reading:

Wednesday, February 1, 2023

Alberta Premier, Danielle Smith, objects to expanding euthanasia to include mental illness.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

On December 15, Canada's Liberal government announced that they are delaying the implementation of euthanasia for mental illness alone. Euthanasia for mental illness alone was approved by Bill C-7 in March 2021, but a moratorium was placed on it until March 17, 2023 to provide enough time for the government to establish rules for killing people with mental illnesses.

The December 15 announcement to delay implementation of euthanasia for mental illness alone did not include a new time-line.


Premier Danielle Smith
An article by Arthur Green for the Western Standard quotes Alberta Premier, Danielle Smith as stating:
"We are consulting with legal and mental health experts regarding the proposed legislation and its impact on those with mental health challenges," said a statement from Smith's office on Monday.

"Given the Government of Alberta’s responsibility to deliver health care services and to regulate the health care profession, we object to the federal government moving forward with expanding MAiD eligibility without agreement from the province."

Alex Schadenberg
Green also interviewed me (Alex Schadenberg) and reported:
negative press pushed back the government’s timeline for the time being.

“The overwhelming pressure on the government was to hold back now,”

Schadenberg said the Liberals may have delayed the implementation because of a possible election in the spring. He expects the final guidelines will probably require a year’s effort of mental health supports and a psychiatrist’s additional approval, similar to what is done in the Netherlands.
I actually stated that the final guidelines could require a year of mental health supports before the psychiatrist approves the death, as is required by protocols in the Netherlands.

Canadian Provinces have the right to decide whether or not they will permit euthanasia for mental illness. Québec has already decided not to permit euthanasia for mental illness alone. Hopefully Alberta will open up the debate by declaring that they will not implement euthanasia for mental illness.

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Ontario 2022 euthanasia (MAiD) deaths increase by 27% to 3934.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

The Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario released the December 2022 MAiD data which indicated that in 2022 there were 3934 reported euthanasia deaths up by 27% from 3102 in 2021.

The Ontario euthanasia data indicates that have been 13,732 (MAiD) deaths since legalization in June 2016. For clarity, there were 13,729 euthanasia deaths and 3 assisted suicide deaths.

According to the data, of the 3934 euthanasia deaths in 2022, 121 were people who were not terminally ill, 20 of the deaths were followed by organ donation and the final consent was waived in 190 deaths. The final consent is waived when a person has become incompetent.

A 27% increase in Ontario euthanasia deaths is significant but less than the 51% increase reported in Québec. (Link to article).

The seventh annual report from Québec’s Commission on end of life care was filed in Québec’s National Assembly on December 9, 2022 covering the (April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022) period. The report declared that there were 3663 reported euthanasia deaths representing 5.1% of all deaths.

Unlike Ontario, Québec has a multiple reporting system. The Québec report indicated that a discrepancy of 289 euthanasia deaths were reported when comparing the practitioner reports to the Collège des Médecins du Québec reports.

The Ontario data may not be accurate because it only relies on the voluntary reports submitted by the practitioners who cause the death.

The trends in Ontario mirror the national trends.

Health Canada released the Third Annual Report on Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada (2021) in July 2022. According to the Third Annual report there were:       

10,064 assisted deaths in 2021 up from 7603 in 2020, 5661 in 2019, 4480 in 2018, 2838 in 2017 and 1018 in 2016. The report indicated that in 2021  the number of assisted deaths increased by 32.4% representing 3.3% of all deaths with the total number of reported (MAiD) assisted deaths in Canada from legalization until December 31, 2021 at 31,664.

Is there enough killing yet?

In April, 2022; CTV news story reported on a euthanasia death in February 2022 of a 51-year-old Ontario woman who had multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS). According to report, the woman was not terminally ill but living with a chronic condition that made her highly sensitive to chemicals and environmental allergies. This woman was killed not because of an “irremediable medical condition” but because she couldn't afford appropriate housing.

Soon after CTV news reported on a 31-year-old Ontario woman with MCS who was also approved to be killed by euthanasia. These reports of euthanasia for MCS created awareness that euthanasia was becoming a “treatment” for people with disabilities who were living with poverty or issues related to housing or other social conditions. The good news was that this story resulted in a GoFundMe campaign that raised money to enable this woman to afford a clean place to live.

There was the story in September 2022 of a mother who started a campaign to prevent the euthanasia death of her 23-year-old son with diabetes. EPC launched a petition campaign and the mother successfully challenged the euthanasia doctor, who then cancelled the death.

There was the October 2022 story of a disabled Ontario man who was seeking death by euthanasia to avoid homelessness. He was unable to find a new place to live after the building he was living in was sold. This man relied on a disability benefit and he was unable to find an affordable place to live. He said that he would rather die than become homeless. Thankfully a  GoFundMe campaign raised enough money to enable him to find a place to live.

I was very pleased by the recent news that Portugal's Constitutional Court rejected a euthanasia bill for the second time based on the imprecise language of the bill.

Canada's euthanasia law employs imprecise language that has been loosely interpreted. Sadly the deaths by euthanasia continue to increase exponentialy in Canada.

More information:

Portugal's Constitutional Court rejects another euthanasia bill.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Portugal's Constitutional Court has once again rejected, a euthanasia bill that was passed by Portugal's parliament. President Marcelo de Sousa vetoed another euthanasia bill last year before the election.

André Ventura, who is the leader of the Chega party, is calling for a referendum on euthanasia.

The Portugal News reported:
The Constitutional Court considered that “an intolerable lack of definition as to the exact scope of application” of the decree on medically assisted death had been created, noting that the parliament went “further”, changing “in essential aspects” the previous bill.

This was the third decree approved by parliament to decriminalise medically assisted death in a period of about two years.

The first was also declared unconstitutional by the TC, in March 2021, following a request for preventive inspection by the President of the Republic, due to insufficient normative densification.
In November of the same year, Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa used the political veto in relation to the second parliamentary decree on this matter, as it contained contradictory expressions.
The current bill passed on December 9. Similar to the previous two bills, the bill uses vague language, as the Constitutional Court stated, the bill had "an intolerable lack of definition as to the exact scope of the application."

The European Institute of Bioethics reported on January 12 on the concerns with the text of the bill (google translated):
In the new text adopted at the end of 2022 by the parliament, the “intolerable” character of the suffering is no longer required in the patient; henceforth, only “great intensity” suffering would suffice. This condition is not, moreover, required in the case of “permanent damage of extreme gravity”. In addition, the term “fatal disease” is removed in favor of “serious and incurable diseases”, thus positioning the act of euthanasia as a means of causing death and not of accelerating it.

More broadly, the Portuguese law in itself raises serious ethical concerns, because it entails, in the words of Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, a "considerable change from the point of view of the balance between the value of life and the right to self-determination", authorizing euthanasia even when the patient is not at the end of life.
On January 29, 2021, Portugal's parliament passed the first euthanasia bill. On February 19, President de Sousa referred the bill to Portugal's Constitutional court for evaluation. President de Sousa stated that the bill was:
"excessively imprecise," potentially creating a situation of "legal uncertainty."
On March 15, the Portuguese American Journal reported that the Constitutional court rejected the first bill and stated:
“the law is imprecise in identifying the circumstances under which those procedures can occur.” The court stated the law must be “clear, precise, clearly envisioned and controllable.” The law lacks the “indispensable rigor."
On November 30, 2021, President de Sousa vetoed the second euthanasia bill because of contradictions in it's language. The Associated Press reported:
This time, the president is returning the reworded law to the national assembly, according to a statement posted on the Portuguese presidency’s website late on Monday, arguing that further clarification is needed in “what appear to be contradictions” regarding the causes that justify resorting to death with medical assistance.

Whereas the original bill required “fatal disease” as a pre-requisite, the president’s argument followed, the renewed version mentions “incurable” or “serious” disease in some of its formulation. No longer considering that patients need to be terminally ill means, in De Sousa’s opinion, “a considerable change of weighing the values ​​of life and free self-determination in the context of Portuguese society.”
The Associated Press reported in June 2022 that the new euthanasia bills, that were being debated, did not fulfill President de Sousa's concerns. According to the article:
...none of the four new bills addresses Rebelo de Sousa’s specific concerns. Instead, they attempt to simplify circumstances where euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are justified by referring to “a situation of intolerable suffering, with a definitive injury of extreme seriousness or a serious and incurable disease.”
A new concerns is that André Ventura, the leader of the Chega, has called for a referendum. The Portugal News quoted Ventura as stating:
"this process can only be resolved with a referendum", maintaining that "an issue of this importance, twice declared unconstitutional by the TC, can only be resolved with the direct participation of Portuguese citizens."
All three euthanasia bills were either declared unconstitutional or vetoed based on the imprecise language of the bill. The euthanasia lobby appear to be following Canada's lead by passing euthanasia bills that lack definition. Legislation that are not sufficiently defined will naturally expand over time.

Euthanasia directly and intentionally causes the death of a person by lethal injection. Portugal needs to commit to a culture that cares for its citizens in need, not kills.

Alzheimer’s Association Terminates Partnership with Assisted-Suicide Advocacy Group

This article was published by National Review online on January 30, 2023.

By Wesley Smith

Alzheimer’s disease runs in my family. My mother and uncle both died from it, so I have intimately witnessed the worst that the disease can inflict.

I also know how much people with the condition need love, understanding, and patience. They are still the persons they have always been, just compromised and dependent.

I also know how vulnerable people with dementia are and how easily they can be manipulated. I am also aware that too many denigrate them as less than human — so-called non-persons — and view their lives as no longer worth living.

People are understandably terrified of the disease. Consequently, as the Catholic bioethicist Charles Camosy has written, people with dementia are targets of the euthanasia movement. That is why I was appalled when Compassion and Choices — the country’s most prominent assisted-suicide advocacy organization — bragged that it had partnered with the Alzheimer’s Association to advocate on behalf of Alzheimer’s patients. C & C talks a good game about end-of-life care, but their primary mission is to push suicide as an answer to serious illness.

An association dedicated to the care of people with the disease had no business affiliating in any way with a group that advocates assisted suicide.

Now, the Alzheimer’s Association has seen C & C for what it really is and has terminated the relationship. From the AA press release:
Alzheimer’s disease, the Alzheimer’s Association entered into an agreement to provide education and awareness information to Compassion & Choices, but failed to do appropriate due diligence. Their values are inconsistent with those of the Association. We deeply regret our mistake, have begun the termination of the relationship, and apologize to all of the families we support who were hurt or disappointed. Additionally, we are reviewing our process for all agreements including those that are focused on the sharing of educational information.

As a patient advocacy group and evidence-based organization, the Alzheimer’s Association stands behind people living with Alzheimer’s, their care partners and their health care providers as they navigate treatment and care choices throughout the continuum of the disease. Research supports a palliative care approach as the highest quality of end-of-life care for individuals with advanced dementia.
Right. Care — not killing! Good for the Alzheimer’s Association. I just wish more such organizations understood that the activists of C & C are suicide pushers. They are not the friends of the ill and afflicted.

Monday, January 30, 2023

EPC February 9 Webinar: Where can we go from here?

Join the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition Zoom webinar on Thursday, February 9 at 7 pm (Eastern Time) with Gordon Friesen and Alex Schadenberg titled: Where can we go from here?

The webinar will include an update on Canada's euthanasia law and provide some direction related to Canada's healthcare system and the need for creating Compassionate Community Care.

Register in advance: (Registration Link)

Gordon Friesen is the President of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition and a disability leader. He has studied and followed the euthanasia issue since the 1990's.

Alex Schadenberg is the Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition since 1999 and the International Chair since 2007.

The webinar will include up-to-date information and direction while providing an opportunity for people to share questions and concerns.

Register in advance: (Registration Link)

Alzheimer's Association ends agreement with assisted suicide group. Killing is not caring.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Alzheimer's is a terrible condition. Research, treatment and care is needed for people with Alzheimer's and their families. 

The Alzheimer's Association announced that they have ended their agreement with an assisted suicide group.

Contact the Alzheimer's Association at: media@alz.org and thank them that they have recognized that: 

Assisted suicide does not maximize quality care and support. 

A world without Alzheimer's must not be achieved by killing people with Alzheimer's

Assisted suicide is the ultimate form of abandonment. People with Alzheimer's deserve to be cared for and upheld as a human person deserving of life with dignity.

The Alzheimer's Association sent out a media release on January 29 stating that they have ended their agreement with Compassion & Choices. Here is the release:

January 29, 2023
Email: media@alz.org

Chicago, January 29, 2023 — In an effort to provide information and resources about Alzheimer’s disease, the Alzheimer’s Association entered into an agreement to provide education and awareness information to Compassion & Choices, but failed to do appropriate due diligence. Their values are inconsistent with those of the Association. We deeply regret our mistake, have begun the termination of the relationship, and apologize to all of the families we support who were hurt or disappointed. Additionally, we are reviewing our process for all agreements including those that are focused on the sharing of educational information.

As a patient advocacy group and evidence-based organization, the Alzheimer’s Association stands behind people living with Alzheimer’s, their care partners and their health care providers as they navigate treatment and care choices throughout the continuum of the disease. Research supports a palliative care approach as the highest quality of end-of-life care for individuals with advanced dementia.

About the Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a worldwide voluntary health organization dedicated to Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to lead the way to end Alzheimer's and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's and all other dementia®. Visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.
The Alzheimer's Society has recognized that promoting assisted suicide denies their clients the human and dignified care that they need and deserve. Killing is not caring.

Saturday, January 28, 2023

Canada’s Euthanasia (MAiD) law is the most permissive in the world. How did this happen?

Alex Schadenberg
Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

In 2015 the Supreme Court of Canada struck down Canada’s laws that protected people from euthanasia and assisted suicide. The case, known as the Carter case, was based on Kay Carter (89), who was not terminally ill but lived with spinal stenosis and died by assisted suicide in Switzerland, and Gloria Taylor, who lived with ALS.

At that time I wrote how the Supreme Court of Canada's decision was irresponsible and dangerous, but the Supreme Court did state that the federal government was to create a “carefully-designed system” with “stringent limits that are scrupulously monitored and enforced.” Clearly, the government ignored that requirement.

In 2016, while the federal government was debating euthanasia Bill C-14, there were many attempts to amend the bill or to define the language in the bill to fulfill the requirement of the Carter decision. The problem with Bill C-14 was evident, the bill gave doctors and nurse practitioners the right in law to cause the death of their patients, without defining the terminology within the law.

For instance, Bill C-14 stated that euthanasia would be restricted to people “whose natural death was deemed reasonably foreseeable.” The government claimed that this phrase would limit euthanasia to terminally ill people but because the phrase was not defined it created confusion.

Based on a lack of definition I predicted that the euthanasia law would expand based on the practise and the law would be interpreted in an expansive manner.

Soon after the passing of Bill C-14 a couple of people with disabilities launched court challenges to the legal requirement that that their “natural death must be deemed reasonably foreseeable.” They argued that it was discrimination to deny euthanasia to someone who is suffering but not terminally ill.

Even though the interpretation of “reasonably foreseeable” had expanded beyond its original interpretation, in September 2019, a Québec lower court struck down the requirement that a person’s death must be “reasonably foreseeable” in the Truchon decision. Even though this was a lower court decision, the federal government did not appeal the decision, thus expanding euthanasia to people who are not terminally ill.

The original law required that a person must have an “irremediable medical condition” combined with that their “natural death being reasonably foreseeable.” By removing the reasonably foreseeable death requirement, euthanasia became available to nearly anyone with a disability or chronic condition.

The federal government “codified” the Truchon decision into the law by passing Bill C-7 in March 2021. Bill C-7 removed from the original law that death must be “reasonable foreseeable” but C-7 also eliminated the 10-day waiting period for people who are terminally ill, it created a 90-day waiting period for those who are not dying and it permitted euthanasia for people with mentally illness. The government declared a two-year moratorium on euthanasia for mental illness, meaning that on March 17, 2023 euthanasia for mental illness could begin. On December 15, 2022 the federal government announced that they will delay the implementation of euthanasia for mental illness alone.

During the C-7 debate, the disability community were adamant that, if passed, it would lead to people with disabilities dying by euthanasia for social reasons. Due to a lack of definition in the law, they predicted that almost everyone with a disability would qualify for death yet the reason people would ask for death may be related to poverty, an inability to receive medical treatment and other social concerns.

Canada has the most permissive law.

In April, 2022; CTV news story reported on a euthanasia death in February 2022 of a 51-year-old woman who had multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS). According to Favaro, the woman was not terminally ill but living with a chronic condition that made her highly sensitive to chemicals and environmental allergies. I stated that this story represented the ultimate form of abandonment whereby this woman was killed not because of an “irremediable medical condition” but because she couldn't afford appropriate housing.

Soon after CTV news reported on a 31-year-old woman with MCS who was also approved to be killed by euthanasia. These reports of euthanasia for MCS created awareness that euthanasia was becoming a “treatment” for people with disabilities who were living with poverty or issues related to housing or other social conditions. The good news was that this story resulted in a GoFundMe campaign that raised money to enable this woman to afford a clean place to live.

Donna Duncan's daughters
CTV news also reported that the euthanasia death of Donna Duncan was being investigated by the Abbotsford police. Duncan (61) was diagnosed with a concussion after a car accident in February 2020. Due to Covid restrictions, Duncan was unable to access medical treatment or rehabilitation. The concussion symptoms led to other health problems as well as deep depression. Duncan was assessed, approved and then died by euthanasia even though her condition was treatable.

After these stories were published, other stories began to be featured by reporters. There have been several stories concerning people who were approved for euthanasia but were unable to access medical treatment. Some of these people with disabilities required treatment for their symptoms and found that getting approved to be killed was easier than accessing treatment

Canada had now become the most permissive jurisdiction in the world for euthanasia and the world began to wonder why Canada is euthanizing the poor.

Another powerful story was the Canadian veteran who was seeking treatment for PTSD and a Veteran’s Affairs worker told him that he should apply for “MAiD.” When this story was reported, the Ministry of Veteran’s Affairs stated that it had only happened once. Since then it has been reported that several veterans died by euthanasia and at least 6 veterans were told to apply for “MAiD.”

There was the story of a disabled man who was seeking death by euthanasia to avoid homelessness. He was unable to find a new place to live after the building he was living in was sold. This man relied on a disability benefit and he was unable to find an affordable place to live. He said that he would rather die than become homeless. Thankfully a GoFundMe campaign raised enough money to enable him to find a place to live.

Alan Nichols with his brother

A woman with disabilities died by euthanasia based on inadequate home care, a 23-year-old with diabetes was approved for euthanasia, and the story of Alan Nichols keeps coming back as his family wonders why they killed their brother.

To make matters worse, the Quebec College of Physicians are now urging the federal government to legalize euthanasia for newborns, otherwise known as infanticide.

In a few short years Canada went from legalizing euthanasia for terminal illness, then extending it to people with chronic conditions and disabilities and Canada is now considering euthanasia from "mature minors," newborns, people with dementia and more.

There is only one clear line in the sand, that being, is it acceptable for one group of people to kill other people. By legalizing euthanasia, Canadian doctors and nurse practitioners gained the right in law to kill their patients. Once Canada decided that it was acceptable to kill, the only remaining questions are who can be killed and for what reasons. 

Further reading:

Friday, January 27, 2023

Vancouver doctor euthanized a man who was deemed unable to consent.

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Ellen Wiebe
An article by Alexander Raikin published by The New Atlantic last December tells a story of Ellen Wiebe, who runs a euthanasia clinic in Vancouver. This part of the article refers to the fact that Canada's euthanasia law allows death doctor shopping and virtual approvals for death. Raikin wrote:

What if a doctor dutifully screens for eligibility, and rejects someone? Then the person can just go elsewhere.

In another CAMAP seminar recording, we learn of a man who was rejected for MAID because, as assessors found, he did not have a serious illness or the “capacity to make informed decisions about his own personal health.” One assessor concluded “it is very clear that he does not qualify.” But Dying with Dignity Canada connected him with Ellen Wiebe (pronounced “weeb”), a prominent euthanasia provider and advocate in Vancouver. She assessed him virtually, found him eligible, and found a second assessor to agree. “And he flew all by himself to Vancouver,” she said. “I picked him up at the airport, um, brought him to my clinic and provided for him,” meaning she euthanized him.
Raikin then reminds us that Wiebe has stated during public speaking this is “the most rewarding work we’ve ever done.” 

Killing a person who is deemed incompetent is the most rewarding work she has ever done?

Wiebe's long distance killing came back to mind when I published a commentary on the recent article by Erin Anderssen published by the Globe and Mail on January 18 concerns the experience of several families as they grieve the death of family members who died by euthanasia.

Anderssen shares the story of an Ontario woman who was approved for euthanasia in British Columbia without her family knowing. Anderssen wrote:
In Ontario, for instance, a father learned this fall that his adult daughter was being assessed for MAID when she forwarded an e-mail from a B.C. doctor proposing that she travel west to complete the process. By then a plane ticket had already been booked for November. Her parents, who had been caring for her since she was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a young woman, were distraught.

The father, whom The Globe and Mail is not identifying to protect his daughter’s privacy and his relationship with her, says he’d watched, over many months, as MAID consumed his daughter’s day; she pored over how-to information online.

His daughter’s life is not easy, he conceded in an interview. Her mental illness causes fearsome bouts of anger, she spends most of her time alone, and she is plagued by delusions that she is rotting inside from a terminal physical illness.

But certainly, he didn’t think she’d be eligible for an assisted death. While she has some physical health issues, he could not imagine they were serious enough to qualify for MAID....

So it was unfathomable, he says, that a physician was counselling his daughter, who suffers from psychosis, to travel alone halfway across the country. Or that two MAID assessors might approve her without insisting on input from her treating psychiatrist or family doctor. Yet the e-mail suggested an expeditious outcome: If she could get to B.C. – where ostensibly a physical illness might make her eligible – she could qualify within weeks.

The father doesn’t know what illness his daughter used to apply, and was not privy to all the discussions with the MAID clinician. But in the end, the parents managed to persuade their daughter to cancel the plane ticket.
There is no indication in the article that Ellen Wiebe in Vancouver was involved with this case but Wiebe admits to approving euthanasia online and picking up that person at the airport for being killed.
 
Remember, the case that Anderssen is writing about concerned a woman with schizophrenia. Wiebe approved her death even though parliament has a moratorium on euthanasia for mental illness.

 
Wiebe admitted last year that she had killed at least 400 people by euthanasia.