Sunday, November 3, 2019

Laws against assisted suicide provide equal protection under the law.

Jane Campbell
This letter was published in the Guardian on November 1, 2019.

The law as it stands does not discriminate against vulnerable individuals but affords them the same protection under the law as those who are healthy and able bodied, write Tanni Grey-Thompson, Jane Campbell, Liz Carr and Mik Scarlet
Tanni Grey-Thompson
Campaigners for assisted suicide – or assisted dying as they euphemistically refer to it – argue that “the only way to ensure the law is fit for purpose is to hear from those it affects most” (Letters, 31 October). The law as it stands does not only affect those relatives who have made the difficult decision to assist relatives with their journey to Dignitas but also those people in the UK who would be considered typical candidates for assisted suicide, including those who are seriously ill or disabled.
Actress Liz Csrr
The law as it stands does not discriminate against vulnerable individuals but affords them the same protection under the law as those who are healthy and able bodied. We sincerely hope that any inquiry into section 2 of the 1961 Suicide Act will be hearing from everyone who is affected by it, including those who believe it retains a vital principle concerning equality before the law and protecting their fundamental rights.
Tanni Grey-Thompson, Jane Campbell Crossbench, House of Lords, Liz Carr, Mik Scarlet

1 comment:

R. Enns said...

In response I refer you to my piece on freedom of individual choice versus equality published on the CBC opinions site. "Freedom or Equality"
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/opinion-ruth-enns-maid-disability-1.5318540

Printfriendly